Showing posts with label of. Show all posts
Showing posts with label of. Show all posts

Monday, June 17, 2024

Causes and treatment of mania

 Causes and treatment of mania


Mental and physical hyperactivity, disordered behavior and excessive increase in thinking is mania or frenzy. It is a type of mental illness, which is classified under anxiety and depression. After getting this disease, a person's feelings and emotions change abnormally and the person's behavior, thinking, sleep and social interactions start to look unbalanced.



Depression is despair, while mania is the opposite of excitement and happiness. In this disease, people like to be happy, laugh, talk a lot, dance and sing songs for no reason. Similarly, symptoms such as sudden anger, impatience and increased sexual desire also appear. This happens in all people, like mood swings or excessive liking. If it does not have any negative impact on daily life, it can be taken as normal, but if it has affected personal and professional life for at least 6 months, then it is considered as mental illness.


Symptoms seen in mania


- Frequent high self-esteem and ambitious thinking, but not working hard to achieve goals


- Sudden impulse


- Being abnormal in sexual behavior


- I have such thoughts and ideas that I either do not sleep or do not sleep much


- Talking abnormally (slurring)


- Playing a lot of things in the mind


- Being impatient, talking big but unable to do anything in essence. If due to depression i.e. mania bipolar, a person can reach severe mental illness (psychotic). Therefore, it is necessary to treat it on time.


How is mania?


It is caused by biological, genetic and psychosocial reasons.


Biological causes: Biological causes include imbalanced neurotransmitter chemistry in the brain. It appears that mania occurs when there is a problem in the hypothalamus of the brain. It is also called the center of satisfaction. When there is a disturbance in it, one cannot be satisfied and at this time the dopamine neurotransmitter is released in the brain, while the level of serotonin is low, which makes one want to do the same thing again and again and enjoy it. Even if someone in the family has a history of mania, other members of that family are at risk of developing mania.


Psychosocial cause: People with bipolar tend to get this disease. Similarly, people with seasonal mood disorders, people with dementia, sudden death of a close relative, passing away, physical and mental trauma, brain injury can get this disease.


Types of mania


There are many types of mania, among which hypomania, delusional mania and delusional mania are the main ones. Hypomania: This is a condition where the person seems to adjust their daily and professional routines. In this situation, a person may feel that something has changed in his thinking and behavior.


Delirious Mania: In this condition, the person looks very ambivalent. In this case, immediate treatment is needed.


Delusional Mania: In this condition, the person is very delusional. As a result, his social relationships deteriorate one after the other, problems arise in family and marital relationships, if something is shown to be wrong, he gets angry if it is not true, does not accept and does not scare others by saying that 'only I have extraordinary abilities', stays in his own world. .

Treatment


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is used to treat mania. It helps to control the patient's depression and excitement. Similarly, in some cases, self-care and family medicine should also be adopted.


Who is at risk?


This mental problem can start at any stage and age. This problem is especially common among people aged 15 to 25 years. The problem of mania is very visible in teenagers.


Will it heal completely?


If it is normal type of mania, it will be cured within 6 months to 3 years. But there is also the possibility of returning again. The disease can be prevented by taking into account the person, his environment (family, profession), but if there is any disharmony, there is a possibility of reoccurrence.


Mental Health: 11 Myths and Truths


Many misconceptions about mental health have been around for centuries. Some associate it with the effects of ghosts and ghosts or the fruits of previous births, while others call mental illness insanity.


What this situation shows is that people are not so aware of the problems related to mental health. For this reason, many people do not like to tell anyone about their health problems such as stress or depression. Instead, they keep it hidden.


What are the illusions?


Myth: People with mental health problems are mentally weak and cannot work.


- Having problems with mental health does not mean that a person's intellectual ability decreases or that he has a dull intellect. Having a mental problem does not mean that a person cannot make his place in society. The reality of this is that even if a particular person has some kind of mental health problem, he can lead a normal life.


Until this problem becomes serious, daily and family life can be easily lived.


Delusion: Mental illness is seen only in certain people.


- This is also not true. Studies on mental health have concluded that one in five people may experience mental illness at some point in their lives.


So it seems that anyone can have mental health problems in one way or another.


Delusion: Mental problems cannot be cured once they are seen.


- Mental problems can appear in different ways depending on the person. One is that mental problems are not caused by one cause and one disease. Mental problems have stages. Which may return to normal with time.


In most cases, drug treatment, various types of therapy can be cured or controlled.



Misconception: People with mental problems will be cured by behavior after marriage.


Truth: This is a misunderstanding. Brain-related problems can be treated with a skilled doctor, proper medication and a positive environment.


If he gets married after leaving the treatment, not only his condition but also that of his spouse may deteriorate.


Myth: All people with mental problems are violent and aggressive.


- There is no complete truth in this statement. People with mental health problems are themselves at risk of violence and assault.


According to the data of the World Health Organization, 9 out of every 10 people with mental problems are victims of human rights violations in one way or another.


They have as much anger as a healthy person. But in some serious cases, if there is no treatment or there is an imbalance in the amount of medicine being used, they may sometimes appear like Hrinsak.


Myth: Children and adolescents do not have mental health problems.


- More than 50 percent of mental health problems begin before the age of 14. Childhood abuse, poverty, accidents, bullying, sexual abuse, domestic strife, trauma after someone's untimely death in the family, etc. can be the causes of mental problems in children.


WHO has also stated that 1 in every 5 children and adolescents have some kind of mental health problem.


Myth: Mental health problems are caused by personal weaknesses.


- Mental health problems can develop due to biological, environmental, social and psychological reasons.


Therefore, it cannot be said that the problem is caused by a person's personal weakness or lack of self-strength.

Myth: People with mental health problems cannot be helped.


- If you can provide emotional support to people with mental problems, their health will gradually improve. The more they live alone, the more they are at risk of negative thoughts.


Therefore, sitting with them and listening carefully to what they want to express can help such a person a lot.


It seems that people with mental problems are called crazy in the society, which is wrong. It is everyone's duty to respect them and protect them as much as possible.


Illusion: Being mentally ill, they pretend to get attention from others.


- In diseases like mental illnesses, anxiety and 'bio polar disorder', behaviors such as trembling, crying, and convulsions can be seen. In such a situation, some may perceive it as a witch or a deity or pretending to attract the attention of others, which is wrong. These are symptoms of mental problems. The identification and successful treatment of which can lead to proper management.


Delusion: People with mental problems have low will power.


- In our society, there is a misconception that only people with low willpower can suffer from mental illness or that people with mental problems do not have willpower. But this is not true, because mental illness affects the mind and not the strength of the person.


Misconception: As soon as you have a mental illness, you should be admitted to a mental hospital.


- It is not necessary to be hospitalized as soon as a mental illness occurs. In some cases, they need to go to the hospital for treatment and follow-up. But you don't have to stay in the hospital for a long time.


Their successful treatment is more important than how well the family members are able to care for them.


How healthy are you? It can be detected by the color of urine

 How healthy are you? It can be detected by the color of urine


Red, yellow, pink and green. Sometimes the color of urine can be like a rainbow. It can also be purple, orange or blue in color. Many such changes in the color of urine cannot be considered a normal condition.



Our body removes waste through urine. It also flushes out the nitrogenous wastes that are formed by mixing proteins, muscles and red blood cells in the body.


In addition, many other substances such as vitamins and medicines that we eat are excreted from the body through urine.


There are some elements which should not be present in urine. So, when you have a health problem, the question that the doctor often asks is, 'What is the color of your urine?'


From the answer to this question, what is the health condition of the doctor and what kind of treatment can be given? It is easy to guess roughly.


red color


If the color of the urine is red, it indicates that there is blood in it. It can cause problems in any part of the body related to the urinary system. If there is blood in the kidney, bladder, prostate or any tube connected to the ureter, the urine may be red.


Similarly, how blood is excreted through urine depends on many physical conditions. For example, what is the amount of blood in the urine? Looking at how fresh? And, are there other problems while urinating?


If there is a lot of bleeding, the color of the urine looks like 'red wine'.


Such bleeding can be due to many reasons. For example, kidney stones, cancer, trauma, any infection in the urinary tract. Even if you eat beetroot more than necessary, the color of urine can be red.


Under normal conditions, our urine looks like yellow color and orange color. It also depends on how much water we drink.


As water becomes less, the color of urine becomes dark yellow and sometimes orange in color.


If you drink enough fluids, the color of urine will be thin and pale yellow. The substance that makes urine yellow is called 'urobilin'.


Its production process begins with the breakdown of old red blood cells in the body. Those blood cells that are not in good shape need to be removed from the body system.


In this process, a compound called bilirubin is formed. It exits the body to some extent through the urinary tract and to some extent through the intestines. Bilirubin is used in our liver to produce bile that is released when we eat. This pitta is important for digestion and helps break down fat in the body.


Bile stays in the intestines and passes out through the stool. Due to this pitta, the stool looks brown in color. Bile can also be unable to reach the intestine, which indicates gallstones or cancer blocking the bile ducts. In this case, bilirubin returns to the bloodstream. And it comes out through urine.


Therefore, the color starts to darken, appearing orange or brown. If the amount of bilirubin increases, the color of the skin also starts to turn yellow. This condition of the body is called 'obstructive jaundice' i.e. a type of jaundice.


In this case, if the amount of bilirubin increases, the color of the face becomes yellow. Some medications, including the antibiotic rifampicin, can cause orange urine.



Green and blue


Green and blue colors are rarely seen. If the color of the urine is green or blue while urinating in the toilet, the person may be surprised.


If green or blue dyes are used to color any food, the color of urine may be green or blue. Eating such foods in excess can cause such urine.


Taking some medicines like anesthetics, vitamins, antihistamines can also cause the color of urine to be green or blue. Some bacteria also make compounds, which are green in color.


Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria produce blue and green colored pyocyanin.


Urinary tract infection can be seen in rare cases. In such a situation, urinating may cause burning and pain.



female stomachache because poisonous food

purple


This situation is also rare. One possible cause of this is porphyria. It is a genetic disease that affects the skin and nervous system.


The second reason for this is a rare disease called Purple Urine Bag Syndrome. Which is due to urinary tract infection.


In this case, using a catheter (a device used medically to remove urine from the body) also makes the urine purple.


pink


A small amount of beetroot can cause the color of urine to be pink instead of dark red. In such cases, urologists compare it to red wine.


There may be other colors of urine, which are not part of the rainbow. Some are dark in color. Usually brown or black. When this happens, doctors may compare it to Coca-Cola.


other diseases


The color of the urine can be brown or black, which the doctor can compare to Coca-Cola. Sometimes this color appears when muscles are broken down and converted into a compound called myoglobin. Which is a sign of a serious disease called rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, excessive exertion or the use of some medicines may be necessary.


Similarly, bilirubin can also cause black and gray color. Bilirubin makes the urine so dark that it appears both black and brown in color.


Kidney swelling

This color can also be seen in acne (glomerulonephritis). Due to this, when passing through the urinary tract, the urine changes from red to brown in color and sometimes the urine can be colorless.


Urine should not be dark yellow in color. Likewise, a large amount of thin urine can also indicate some diseases. Whether it is due to diabetes or excessive alcohol consumption.


It shows how many different colors our urine can be and how many different problems it can indicate. And, this is by no means a list of every problem.


But understanding the reason for the change in urine color will help you decide whether to drink water or see a doctor.


Is frequent urination at night a sign of diabetes?


A night's sleep acts as a medicine for the tiredness of the day. If something disturbs the sleep, there will be many problems. Frequent urination at night is one of the reasons that disrupts sleep.


If you have to go through this problem every day, it is not normal. This problem is related to diet and lifestyle, Dr. Veer Hospital's chief consultant Eurosurgeon. Ravin Bahadur Basnet says.


"Frequent urination at night can also indicate diabetes, urinary tract infection or prostate disease," he says.


Drinking a lot of water makes you urinate frequently?


Many people think that because they drink a lot of water before going to bed, it is normal to urinate a lot at night. But it doesn't always happen. This can be a symptom of diabetes and other serious problems. Vinay Bhattarai says.


If you drink a lot of water before going to bed, sometimes you may urinate frequently at night. But if there is a problem of frequent urination at night, drinking water before going to sleep or drinking too much water may not be the reason, he says.


Dr. Bhattarai continues, “Diabetes increases blood sugar levels, which puts a lot of pressure on the kidneys and they cannot absorb the extra sugar completely. As a result, excess sugar is excreted through urine, but at this time, a large amount of water is also absorbed from the body. As a result, more urine starts coming out. In such a situation, when you feel very thirsty, the amount of water increases and you urinate frequently.


In diabetes, there is frequent urination not only at night but also during the day. If there is a problem of dry mouth and frequent urination, Bhattarai suggests getting diabetes checked.


Other causes of frequent urination


Dr. If you do not urinate frequently during the day, but you have to urinate frequently at night, it may also be due to heart problems. Basnet says. "If the heart is not working properly during the day, water accumulates in the lower part of the leg while standing and sitting," he says. Makes and may urinate frequently at night.'


Frequent urination in men can be a symptom of prostate problems. As the age increases, the prostate gland increases and frequent urination occurs not only at night but also during the day.


"Urinary tract infection (UTI) due to the infection of the urinary tract, the problem of frequent urination at night also appears," said Dr. Bhattarai says, "Even if there is an infection in the kidneys, urine can come many times during the night."


He says that a woman's frequent urination at night is also a common early sign of pregnancy. He says that this problem appears when the growing fetus puts pressure on the bladder.


If you urinate frequently at night, you should first have a urine test to identify whether there is any health problem. If there is no identification from that, other tests such as ultrasound should be done," said Dr. Bhattarai says, "We find out whether there is any problem in the test. If a problem appears, it should be treated on the advice of a doctor.

Sunday, January 21, 2024

What is mode of production. Compare and contrast economic features of feudal and capitalist mode of production.

 What is mode of production. Compare and contrast economic features of feudal and capitalist mode of production.


**Mode of Production:**

The mode of production refers to the way in which a society organizes and carries out economic activities, including how goods and services are produced, distributed, and consumed. It involves the relationships between the means of production (such as land, labor, and capital) and the social relations of production (such as the organization of labor and the distribution of resources). Marx identified different historical modes of production, each characterized by distinct economic structures and class relations.



**Feudal Mode of Production:**


1. **Economic Structure:**

   - Land is the primary means of production in feudalism. The feudal lord owns the land and grants portions to vassals (nobles) in exchange for loyalty and services.

   - Agricultural production is central, and the majority of the population works as peasants on the lord's land.


2. **Class Relations:**

   - Feudal society is characterized by a hierarchical structure. The king or monarch is at the top, followed by nobles and vassals, with peasants forming the majority.

   - Serfs, tied to the land, provide labor in exchange for protection from the lord.


3. **Surplus Extraction:**

   - Surplus extraction occurs primarily through direct control of land. Lords extract surplus through a portion of the agricultural produce produced by peasants.


4. **Economic Dynamics:**

   - The feudal system is static, with limited social mobility. Social status and economic roles are largely determined by birth.


**Capitalist Mode of Production:**


1. **Economic Structure:**

   - Capitalism is characterized by private ownership of the means of production, such as land and factories.

   - Wage labor becomes a central feature, with workers selling their labor power to capitalists (owners) in exchange for wages.


2. **Class Relations:**

   - Capitalist society is marked by a class division between the bourgeoisie (capitalist class) and the proletariat (working class).

   - The bourgeoisie owns the means of production, while the proletariat sells their labor to survive.


3. **Surplus Extraction:**

   - Surplus extraction occurs through the production process. Capitalists accumulate surplus value by paying workers less than the value produced by their labor.


4. **Economic Dynamics:**

   - Capitalism is characterized by dynamic economic growth, technological advancements, and constant innovation.

   - Social mobility is theoretically possible, as individuals can accumulate wealth and change their class position.


**Comparison:**


1. **Ownership of Means of Production:**

   - Feudalism: Means of production, especially land, are owned by the feudal lords.

   - Capitalism: Means of production, including land and factories, are privately owned by individuals or corporations.


2. **Labor Relations:**

   - Feudalism: Serfs provide labor in exchange for protection, and there is limited mobility.

   - Capitalism: Workers sell their labor power for wages, and social mobility is theoretically possible.


3. **Role of Surplus Extraction:**

   - Feudalism: Surplus extraction is mainly through control of land and agricultural produce.

   - Capitalism: Surplus extraction occurs within the production process through wage labor.


4. **Social Mobility:**

   - Feudalism: Social mobility is restricted, and social roles are often determined by birth.

   - Capitalism: Social mobility is theoretically possible, allowing for the accumulation of wealth and change in class position.


5. **Economic Dynamics:**

   - Feudalism: Economic activity is relatively static, with limited technological progress.

   - Capitalism: Dynamic economic growth, technological innovation, and constant change characterize capitalist economies.


In summary, the feudal and capitalist modes of production represent distinct economic structures with different ownership relations, labor dynamics, and mechanisms of surplus extraction. The transition from feudalism to capitalism marked a significant shift in societal organization and economic relations.


Class and class struggle.


**Class:**
In the context of Marxist theory, a class is a social group characterized by its relationship to the means of production. The two primary classes in capitalist societies, as identified by Karl Marx, are the bourgeoisie and the proletariat.

- **Bourgeoisie:** The capitalist class, or owners of the means of production (factories, land, resources). They derive profit from the labor of the proletariat.

- **Proletariat:** The working class, those who sell their labor power to the bourgeoisie. They do not own the means of production and are dependent on wages for their livelihood.

**Class Struggle:**
Class struggle refers to the ongoing conflict and tension between social classes, particularly between the bourgeoisie and the proletariat. Marx argued that this struggle is intrinsic to capitalist societies and is rooted in the fundamental economic relations of production.

- **Nature of Class Struggle:**
  - **Economic Exploitation:** The primary source of class struggle is the exploitation of the proletariat by the bourgeoisie. The capitalist system relies on extracting surplus value from the labor of workers.

  - **Conflicts of Interest:** The interests of the bourgeoisie and proletariat are inherently conflicting. While the bourgeoisie seeks to maximize profits, the proletariat aims to improve working conditions, wages, and gain control over their labor.

- **Forms of Class Struggle:**
  - **Economic Strikes:** Workers may engage in strikes to demand better wages, improved working conditions, or protest against unfair labor practices.

  - **Political Movements:** Class struggle can manifest in political movements advocating for workers' rights, social equality, and sometimes revolutionary change.

  - **Unionization:** Formation of labor unions is a way for the proletariat to collectively negotiate with the bourgeoisie for better terms of employment.

- **Historical Materialism:**
  - Marx's historical materialism asserts that the dynamics of class struggle drive historical change. Transitions from one mode of production to another (e.g., feudalism to capitalism) are propelled by class conflicts.

- **Role of Class Consciousness:**
  - Class consciousness refers to the awareness among the proletariat of their common interests and collective identity. Marx argued that the development of class consciousness is crucial for effective class struggle.

**Critiques and Developments:**
- Some critics argue that the modern working class may not align precisely with Marx's industrial proletariat, leading to challenges in applying traditional Marxist class analysis.
- Contemporary Marxist scholars explore intersections of class with other social categories, such as race and gender, acknowledging the complexities of identity and inequality.

In summary, class and class struggle are foundational concepts in Marxist theory, providing a lens to understand the dynamics of power, exploitation, and societal change within capitalist systems.

Historical marerialism.


**Historical Materialism:**

Historical materialism is a key concept in Marxist theory developed by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. It is a methodological approach to understanding societal development and change, emphasizing the role of material conditions in shaping historical processes. The central tenets of historical materialism include:

1. **Primacy of Material Conditions:**
   - Historical materialism posits that the material or economic structure of a society—specifically, the mode of production—forms the foundation upon which all other social, political, and cultural structures are built.

2. **Modes of Production:**
   - Societies are characterized by distinct modes of production, each with its specific relations of production and means of production. Marx identified historical epochs, such as feudalism, capitalism, and socialism, as different modes of production.

3. **Dialectical Change:**
   - Historical materialism employs a dialectical approach, drawing inspiration from Hegelian dialectics. It sees historical development as a process involving contradictions, conflicts, and transformations. Changes in material conditions lead to social conflicts and, eventually, new social structures.

4. **Class Struggle:**
   - Class struggle is a central dynamic in historical materialism. Changes in the mode of production often arise from conflicts between social classes. For example, the transition from feudalism to capitalism is characterized by the struggle between feudal lords and emerging capitalist classes.

5. **Base and Superstructure:**
   - The economic base, encompassing the relations and means of production, influences the superstructure, which includes cultural, legal, political, and ideological institutions. Changes in the base drive changes in the superstructure.

6. **Revolutionary Change:**
   - Historical materialism suggests that significant societal transformations often require revolutionary change, particularly changes in the mode of production. For Marx, the transition from capitalism to socialism would involve a proletarian revolution.

7. **Human Agency and Consciousness:**
   - While material conditions shape societal structures, historical materialism recognizes the role of human agency. People act within the constraints of their material conditions but can also influence and transform those conditions. Class consciousness, or awareness of one's social class and interests, is crucial for social change.

**Application to History:**

1. **Feudalism to Capitalism:**
   - Marx applied historical materialism to explain the transition from feudalism to capitalism. Changes in agricultural technology, property relations, and the rise of merchant capitalism played pivotal roles in this historical process.

2. **Capitalism to Socialism:**
   - Marx envisioned the proletarian revolution as the next stage in historical development, leading to the establishment of socialism. The transition involves the collective ownership of the means of production and the abolition of class distinctions.

3. **Global Application:**
   - Historical materialism has been used to analyze the development of various societies worldwide, accounting for differences in historical trajectories based on economic structures.

**Critiques and Developments:**

1. **Non-economic Factors:**
   - Critics argue that historical materialism may oversimplify complex historical processes by reducing them solely to economic factors, neglecting the influence of culture, ideas, and non-material forces.

2. **Intersectionality:**
   - Contemporary scholars have expanded historical materialism to consider intersections with race, gender, and other social categories, recognizing that class is just one dimension of social hierarchy.

3. **Adaptability:**
   - Some argue that historical materialism is adaptable and can be applied to understand various forms of societal development beyond the classic capitalist framework.

Historical materialism remains a foundational concept in Marxist thought, providing a framework for analyzing the historical development of societies and the interconnectedness of economic, social, and political structures.


Marxist notion of consciousness.


The Marxist notion of consciousness is a critical aspect of Karl Marx's philosophical and sociological framework. In Marxist theory, consciousness refers to the awareness, beliefs, and ideas that individuals hold about themselves, society, and their position within the social structure. Key components of the Marxist notion of consciousness include:

1. **Base and Superstructure:**
   - Marx proposed the concept of the base and superstructure to explain the relationship between the economic structure of society (base) and the cultural, political, and ideological elements (superstructure). Consciousness is seen as part of the superstructure and is influenced by the underlying economic conditions.

2. **False Consciousness:**
   - Marx introduced the concept of false consciousness to describe a situation where individuals hold beliefs and ideas that are contrary to their own class interests. This occurs when the dominant ideas in society, often shaped by the ruling class, mislead individuals into accepting and supporting the existing social order.

3. **Class Consciousness:**
   - Class consciousness is a crucial concept in Marxist theory. It refers to the awareness that individuals have of their membership in a particular social class and their understanding of the shared interests and goals of that class. For the proletariat, developing class consciousness is seen as a precursor to revolutionary action.

4. **Ideological State Apparatuses:**
   - Louis Althusser, influenced by Marxist thought, introduced the concept of Ideological State Apparatuses (ISAs). These are institutions like schools, media, and religious organizations that disseminate ideological messages reinforcing the existing social order. They play a role in shaping and maintaining the consciousness of individuals.

5. **Role in Social Change:**
   - Marx believed that changes in the economic base of society would eventually lead to changes in consciousness. As the material conditions of production change, individuals' awareness and understanding of their place in society are expected to evolve, potentially leading to shifts in political and social structures.

6. **Revolutionary Consciousness:**
   - Marx envisioned a process where the proletariat, through developing class consciousness, would achieve revolutionary consciousness. This involves an understanding of the need to overthrow the existing capitalist system and replace it with a socialist or communist society.

7. **Materialism and Consciousness:**
   - Central to Marxist philosophy is historical materialism, emphasizing the material conditions of society as the driving force behind historical development. Consciousness, according to Marx, is rooted in these material conditions, and changes in the mode of production can influence ideological shifts.

8. **Critique of Religion:**
   - Marx famously described religion as the "opium of the people," suggesting that religious beliefs often serve to mask the harsh realities of class-based exploitation. He argued that changes in economic conditions would lead to a transformation in religious and ideological consciousness.

In summary, the Marxist notion of consciousness is intricately linked to the social and economic structures of a given society. It encompasses ideas of false consciousness, class consciousness, and the potential for revolutionary transformation based on shifts in material conditions and individuals' awareness of their social roles.


Tuesday, January 9, 2024

What are the medicinal properties of garlic?

 What are the medicinal properties of garlic?


There is no need to say much about the taste of garlic. It tastes bitter when eaten raw. When it is mixed with pulses, vegetables, the taste changes.


Basically, garlic is used in Nepali cuisine for flavor. However, it is also considered full of medicinal properties. That is why garlic has been used as medicine since ancient times. Garlic is called 'Rason' in Sanskrit. Because out of the 6 juices on earth (bitter, bitter, salty, tart, sour, sweet), garlic has five juices. Garlic does not have only 'sour' juice.



It is called 'Rasone' because 'Ras Un' means one less juice. In Ayurveda, garlic is classified as a pain reliever.


History of Garlic


Garlic has been used for thousands of years in China and Egypt. In 1325 BC, garlic was placed in the tomb of the Egyptian emperor Tutankhamun to preserve the body. At that time, the inhabitants of Egypt used to put garlic in the grave after someone's death. It was believed that when a person reaches the next world after death, he should not be afflicted with diseases.


Similarly, the soldiers going on a long journey also used to carry garlic, so that if there was any problem, they could use it as a medicine.


With the migration of people, the use of garlic became widespread. It is mentioned in history that garlic has entered China and India in the sixth century BC. At that time it was used only for treatment. After that, garlic was gradually used not only in treatment but also in daily life.


The importance of garlic is also mentioned in mythology. According to the story, when Lord Indra took the nectar and brought it to the earth, garlic was born from the drops of nectar that fell.


What can be inferred from these stories is that garlic has been used as a medicinal plant for centuries.


What happens in garlic?


According to medical research, a compound called allicin is mainly found in raw garlic. This is the same element, which has antibacterial and antifungal properties. Also, garlic is rich in salts like phosphorus, zinc, potassium and magnesium. The smell of garlic is pungent because it contains sulphur.


What does garlic do?


Also, garlic is still being used in pulses and vegetables, which may have direct-indirect benefits. Apart from that, eating two to four cloves of garlic on an empty stomach in the morning is beneficial. The 'Allicin' element in garlic helps to protect against various types of infections. It does not allow typhoid, fever, allergy infection.


Garlic is also used to reduce pain in the body. Garlic can be placed on the swollen or painful area and massaged with heated oil. Raw garlic contains the antioxidant sulfhydryl substance, which helps in removing toxins from the body.


Regular use of garlic removes bad cholesterol accumulated in blood vessels. It reduces the risk of heart attack. Consuming garlic in proper amount reduces the pressure on the blood vessels. Garlic is also considered useful for regulating blood pressure. Garlic can be used for some skin problems.


Who should not eat?


Garlic allergy, blood deficiency and if the patient is taking blood thinners, it is advisable not to consume garlic. Because if you consume garlic in such a situation, other problems may increase. Even if you have an ulcer, its consumption is appropriate.


If you are taking any medication or undergoing treatment while using garlic as a medicine, you should consult a doctor.

Friday, December 22, 2023

The Sociology of Markets. Neil Fligstein and Luke Dauter.

 The Sociology of Markets.
Neil Fligstein and Luke Dauter.



The Sociology of Markets, as explored by Neil Fligstein and Luke Dauter, delves into the intricate web of social relationships and structures that underlie market dynamics. This theoretical framework offers a profound understanding of how markets operate not merely as economic entities but as social institutions shaped by human interactions, cultural norms, and institutional arrangements.



One key aspect emphasized by Fligstein and Dauter is the concept of "socially embedded markets." They argue that markets are not detached from society but are deeply embedded within social structures. In their seminal work, the sociologists highlight how relationships, trust, and social networks play a pivotal role in shaping market outcomes. This perspective challenges traditional economic theories that often treat markets as purely rational and efficient entities divorced from social context.


Furthermore, Fligstein and Dauter introduce the notion of "strategic action fields" to explain the ongoing struggles and negotiations within markets. According to this concept, various actors, including firms, regulatory bodies, and consumers, engage in strategic actions to advance their interests. The authors argue that understanding these action fields is crucial for understanding market dynamics, as it sheds light on the power relations, alliances, and conflicts that define market structures.


In their analysis, Fligstein and Dauter also highlight the role of institutions in shaping market behavior. Institutions, both formal and informal, provide a set of rules and norms that guide economic interactions. The sociologists argue that institutional arrangements influence not only individual behavior but also the overall functioning of markets. This perspective aligns with the broader field of economic sociology, which seeks to integrate sociological insights into the study of economic phenomena.


The authors pay particular attention to the concept of "market as a social structure." They argue that markets are not only arenas for economic exchange but also social structures that shape and are shaped by societal values, norms, and power dynamics. This approach challenges the traditional economic view that sees markets primarily as mechanisms for allocating resources efficiently. Instead, Fligstein and Dauter advocate for a more holistic understanding that considers the social and cultural dimensions of markets.


Another crucial element of their work is the examination of market dynamics in relation to globalization. The increasing interconnectedness of markets on a global scale has profound implications for social structures and relationships. Fligstein and Dauter explore how globalization influences the power dynamics within markets, shapes the role of nation-states, and contributes to the emergence of transnational markets.


In conclusion, the Sociology of Markets, as articulated by Neil Fligstein and Luke Dauter, offers a comprehensive and nuanced perspective on the interplay between markets and society. Their emphasis on socially embedded markets, strategic action fields, and the role of institutions provides a rich framework for understanding the complexities of contemporary market systems. By integrating sociological insights into the analysis of markets, Fligstein and Dauter contribute significantly to a more holistic and interdisciplinary understanding of economic phenomena.



Here are key points about "The Sociology of Markets" by Neil Fligstein and Luke Dauter in bullet form:


- **Socially Embedded Markets:**

   - Markets are not isolated from society but deeply connected to social structures.

   - Emphasizes the role of relationships, trust, and social networks in shaping market dynamics.


- **Strategic Action Fields:**

   - Describes ongoing struggles and negotiations among various market actors.

   - Focuses on how actors, including firms and regulatory bodies, engage in strategic actions to advance their interests.


- **Institutional Influence:**

   - Institutions, both formal and informal, play a crucial role in shaping market behavior.

   - Rules and norms provided by institutions guide economic interactions at both individual and market levels.


- **Market as a Social Structure:**

   - Views markets not only as economic arenas but also as social structures.

   - Acknowledges that markets shape and are shaped by societal values, norms, and power dynamics.


- **Globalization Impact:**

   - Examines how globalization influences market dynamics.

   - Considers the interconnectedness of global markets and its implications for power dynamics and the role of nation-states.


- **Holistic Understanding:**

   - Advocates for a more comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to studying markets.

   - Challenges traditional economic perspectives by integrating sociological insights.


- **Power Dynamics:**

   - Highlights the power relations, alliances, and conflicts within Mark etc.

   - Recognizes that understanding these dynamics is essential for understanding market structures.


- **Transnational Markets:**

   - Explores the emergence and impact of transnational markets in the context of globalization.

   - Considers how global interconnectedness influences the behavior of market actors.


- **Cultural Dimensions:**

   - Acknowledges the influence of culture on market behavior.

   - Argues that cultural factors are integral to understanding the complexities of market systems.


- **Economic Sociology Alignment:**

   - Aligns with the broader field of economic sociology.

   - Integrates sociological perspectives into the study of economic phenomena.


These points provide a concise overview of the key concepts and contributions of Fligstein and Dauter's work on the Sociology of Markets.



Here are some important points about "The Sociology of Markets" by Neil Fligstein and Luke Dauter:


- The sociology of markets is a field of study that examines the social, cultural, and economic factors that influence the behavior of individuals and groups within markets.

- Markets are not inherent, but rather are socially constructed, meaning they are shaped by the interactions of individuals and groups within a society.

- Cultural factors play a significant role in shaping market behavior, as they influence how individuals perceive value, make decisions, and interact with others within the market.

- Social structures, such as institutions, organizations, and networks, influence the operation of markets by providing the context within which market participants interact and transact.

- Power dynamics between market participants can impact market outcomes and the distribution of resources.

- The increasing interconnectedness of global markets has led to the emergence of new market dynamics, such as the growth of multinational corporations, the rise of emerging markets, and the intensification of competition.

- Technological advancements have transformed the way markets operate, from the advent of the internet and e-commerce to the development of new technologies that enable real-time trading and information sharing.

- The sociology of markets has been one of the most vibrant fields in sociology in the past 25 years.

- The major ideas in the sociology of markets include the social construction of markets, cultural factors, social structures, power dynamics, globalization, and technological advancements.

- The sociology of markets has made significant progress in exploring context as the 'origins, operations, and dynamics of markets as social structures'.

- The “micro-constructionist” perspective on market creation suggests that markets function when producers and consumers establish a stable social organization with roles and niches.

- For any market to function, supply must be brought into contact with demand in "social spaces where repeated exchanges occur".

- The sociology of markets is a multidisciplinary field that seeks to understand the complex interactions between human behavior, social structures, and market forces.



New variant of Korana also found in Noida, JN.1 variant has raised concern

 New variant of Korana also found in Noida, JN.1 variant has raised concern

Covid-19 JN.1 Variant Updates: According to the data released by the Ministry of Health, 594 new cases of Corona have been registered in the country in the last 24 hours.



Covid-19 JN.1 Variant Updates: The cases of corona virus in the country have started increasing again. According to the data released by the Union Health Ministry on Thursday, 594 new cases of Corona have been registered in the country in the last 24 hours. More new cases of corona are coming from states like Kerala, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu. After the increase in new cases of Corona in the country, the number of active cases has increased to 2669. The government is also on alert due to the rapidly increasing cases of Corona. Let us tell you that for the past few days, cases of the new variant of Corona, JN.1, are also coming to the fore in the country. This new variant is spreading rapidly in countries like China, America and Singapore.


A case of Corona found in Noida


A new case of Corona has also been found in Noida (Gautam Budh Nagar), which is adjacent to the capital Delhi, after many months. A 54-year-old man working in a multinational company in Gurugram has been found corona positive. The local health department is now taking the history of the patient. Instructions have been given to test the people who come in contact with the patient. The sample of the corona positive person has been sent to a lab in Delhi for genome sequencing. The local health department has come into alert mode due to the first case of corona in Noida after months.


Guidelines for screening patients with viral and influenza

The government is working in action mode after a new case of Corona was found in Noida. The order from the government is that the examination of patients with symptoms of viral infection, respiratory tract infection and influenza should be a priority. Patients who have symptoms of the new variant JN.1 should also be screened after their contacts have been taken.


JN.1 Variant Symptoms - JN.1 Variant Symptoms

These symptoms are seen in patients infected with JN.1 variant-


Symptoms of influenza illness

High fever and headache

Muscle pain

sore throat

Physical weakness

runny nose

sore throat

Gastrointestinal problems

Fatigue and muscle weakness


The JN.1 variant, which has been spreading in America and China since September this year, is being said to be more dangerous than the previously found variant. This variant is formed after a mutation in the BA.2.86 variant and Pirola's spike protein. Let us tell you that the spike protein is a part of the virus, which attacks human cells. In this new variant, the ability to dodge the immune system is more than the previously found variant.


These symptoms are seen when infected with the JN.1 variant, warned the former WHO scientist

JN.1 Variant Signs and Symptoms: The JN.1 variant is composed of the BA.2.86 variant and a mutation in Pirola's spike protein.


JN.1 Variant Signs And Symptoms: For the past 3 years, the corona virus epidemic has been a headache for the whole world. In the past few days, the new variant of Corona JN.1 is spreading rapidly all over the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) has called the new JN.1 variant of Corona a 'variant of interest'. Cases of JN.1 variant are also increasing in India. Earlier, the JN.1 variant was confirmed in China, Singapore and the US. The symptoms seen in patients infected with this new JN.1 variant of Corona are not recognized at the beginning. This is the reason why patients can be identified after some time after being infected. Experts believe that the infection capacity of this variant is much higher than the previously found variant and if its infection is not controlled, it can infect many people. Let us know in detail in this article the symptoms and prevention of the new JN.1 variant of Corona.


Symptoms and signs of JN.1 variants


The JN.1 variant, which has been spreading in America and China since September this year, is being said to be more dangerous than the previously found variant. This variant is formed after a mutation in the BA.2.86 variant and Pirola's spike protein. Let us tell you that the spike protein is a part of the virus, which attacks human cells. In this new variant, the ability to dodge the immune system is more than the previously found variant.


When infected with the JN.1 variant, the patient shows these symptoms-


High fever and headache

Symptoms of influenza illness

sore throat

Muscle pain

Physical weakness

runny nose

sore throat

Gastrointestinal problems

Fatigue and muscle weakness


Former scientist of WHO said this - Dr Soumya Swaminathan on The New Covid Variant

Soumya Swaminathan, the former chief scientist of the World Health Organization, said in a conversation with a TV channel that, "It would be a big mistake to think of Covid as a common cold. The risk of mental problems increases." He further said that India is now fully prepared to fight such an infection. In order to avoid infection, special attention should be paid to the immunity of children and the elderly, and masks should be worn in public places.


358 new cases have come in the last 24 hours - Latest Covid Cases in India

According to the data released by the Union Health Ministry, 358 new cases of Corona have been registered in India in the last 24 hours. 84 percent of these cases are from Kerala alone. 300 new cases of corona have been found in Kerala during the last 24 hours. Apart from this, 3 patients have died due to corona virus infection in the country in the last 24 hours, these three deaths are in Kerala. After the registration of new cases, the number of active patients of Kovid in the country has increased to 2,669.


Corona's new variant JN.1 has appeared, know how dangerous it is compared to other variants?

Recently a new variant of Corona JN.1 has come out. According to scientists, it can prove to be more contagious than other variants.


The case of Corona has not completely stopped yet, so new variants of Kovid are being seen. Recently, a new variant of Corona, JN.1, has come out, which has increased the concern of scientists. According to scientists, it is more contagious than other variants. Not only this, it can also be harmful to the immune system.


This variant is found in many countries

According to scientists, it has also been found in England, Iceland and France. This variant was first spotted in Luxembourg on 25 August 2023. However, the good thing is that not a single case of the JN.1 variant has been confirmed in India yet. According to scientists, it is different from JN.1, XBB.1.5 and HV.1 variants. This variant can also trick the immune system. So far 10 mutations have been observed in XBB.1.5 and HV.1. At the same time, 41 changes have been made in the JN.1 variant compared to the XBB.1.5.


Characteristics of the JN.1 variant

The symptoms of this variant may also be similar to the old variants of Kovid.

Exposure to this variant may cause body fatigue and breathing difficulties.

In this situation, along with muscle pain, headache can also occur.

In such a case, along with the problems related to the stomach, the problem of phlegm can also occur.

Exposure to this variant may cause problems with taste or smell.


How important it is to take the vaccine to avoid corona

According to health experts, it is very important to get vaccinated to avoid this variant of Corona. You can avoid damage to the immune system through the vaccine. Some time ago, the updated vaccines of Corona have also become available in India. After which the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advised people to get a new booster dose vaccine to avoid corona infection.

Monday, December 18, 2023

Practice Of Social Change and Development in Asia

Practice Of Social Change and Development in Asia  

Remittances, Migration and Social Development 

A Conceptual Review of the Literature 

Hein de Haas




Hein De Haas has been a prominent scholar in the field of migration studies, and his work often delves into the interconnections between migration, remittances, and social development. Here is a conceptual review of the key themes in the literature:


1. **Remittances and Economic Impact:**

   - Scholars often explore how remittances, which are financial transfers sent by migrants to their home countries, impact the economic development of receiving communities. This includes assessing the role of remittances in poverty alleviation, household income, and local economic development.


2. **Social and Cultural Transformations:**

   - Migration and remittances can bring about social and cultural changes in both sending and receiving communities. Researchers may investigate the impact of migration on family structures, gender roles, and cultural practices.


3. **Developmental Consequences:**

   - The literature may discuss the broader developmental consequences of migration and remittances, considering factors such as education, healthcare, and overall human development indices in the context of remittance-receiving regions.


4. **Migration Policies and Social Development:**

   - De Haas might explore how migration policies, both in sending and receiving countries, influence the social development outcomes associated with migration and remittances. This could involve examining the role of policy frameworks in shaping the impact of migration on communities.


5. **Transnationalism and Social Networks:**

   - Hein De Haas may also focus on the transnational nature of migration and how social networks formed by migrants contribute to social development. This involves looking at how connections between migrants and their home communities shape economic and social outcomes.


6. **Critiques and Challenges:**

   - The literature may address critiques and challenges associated with the optimistic narratives around remittances and social development. This could include discussions on issues like dependency, inequality, and the potential negative consequences of relying heavily on remittances.


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**Introduction:**

The exploration of "Remittances, Migration, and Social Development: A Conceptual Review of The Literature" by Hein De Haas is a journey into the intricate dynamics of how migration, particularly through the flow of remittances, shapes social development. This topic holds particular relevance within the field of sociology as it examines not only the economic dimensions of migration but also its profound social and cultural consequences.


**Background on Hein De Haas:**

Hein De Haas, a luminary in the realm of migration studies, has significantly shaped our understanding of the interplay between migration and societal development. As a professor of Sociology at the University of Amsterdam, his research contributions encompass a diverse range of themes, from the economic impacts of remittances to the social and cultural transformations associated with migration.


**Objectives of the Conceptual Review:**

The overarching objective of this literature review is to glean insights into the multifaceted relationship between remittances, migration, and social development. By delving into De Haas's works, we aim to understand the nuanced connections and uncover the broader implications that extend beyond economic considerations.


**Remittances and Economic Impact:**

One of the central foci of De Haas's research involves examining how remittances, the financial lifelines sent by migrants to their home countries, contribute to the economic development of recipient communities. His work delves into the role of remittances in poverty alleviation, the augmentation of household income, and their influence in fostering local economic development.


**Social and Cultural Transformations:**

Migration is not a mere economic phenomenon; it entails profound social and cultural transformations. De Haas's insights shed light on how migration and the subsequent inflow of remittances influence family structures, redefine gender roles, and contribute to shifts in cultural practices within both sending and receiving communities.


**Developmental Consequences:**

Beyond the immediate economic impacts, migration and remittances have far-reaching consequences for societal development. Hein De Haas's conceptualization extends to factors such as education, healthcare, and overall human development indices within regions that receive remittances.


**Migration Policies and Social Development:**

Understanding the interplay between migration policies and social development outcomes is crucial. De Haas's research explores how policies in both sending and receiving countries shape the impact of migration, providing insights into the regulatory frameworks that influence the development trajectory of communities involved in migration processes.


**Transnationalism and Social Networks:**

Migration is inherently transnational, and De Haas's work delves into the complexities of social networks formed by migrants. These networks, extending across borders, play a pivotal role in shaping social and economic outcomes for both migrants and their home communities.


**Critiques and Challenges:**

In the pursuit of a comprehensive understanding, it is essential to consider critiques and challenges associated with optimistic narratives surrounding remittances. De Haas's research likely engages with issues such as dependency, inequality, and the potential negative consequences that may arise from an overreliance on remittance inflows.


**Conclusion:**

In conclusion, this conceptual review offers a nuanced exploration of remittances, migration, and social development through the lens of Hein De Haas's extensive contributions. The synthesis of economic, social, and cultural dimensions provides a holistic understanding of the complex interplay between migration processes and societal advancement.


**Questions and Discussion:**

As we open the floor to questions and discussion, we invite a thoughtful dialogue on the intricacies uncovered in this conceptual review. It is through such scholarly exchanges that we can further refine our comprehension of the profound implications of remittances and migration on social development.


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## Remittances, Migration, and Social Development: A Conceptual Review of the Literature by Hein de Haas


**Understanding the Intertwined Worlds:**


Hein de Haas, in his work titled "Remittances, Migration, and Social Development: A Conceptual Review of the Literature," delves into the complex relationship between remittances, migration, and social development in developing countries. He offers a comprehensive review of existing literature, building a framework to analyze the intricate ways these elements interact and shape diverse social realities.


**Beyond Sending Money:**


De Haas challenges the simplistic view of remittances as mere financial transfers. He argues that they are embedded within the broader context of migration, serving as a **critical element** in household livelihood strategies. Migrant families often send money back home to support basic needs, education, healthcare, and even entrepreneurial ventures. These remittances become vital lifelines, contributing to **poverty reduction** and improved **living standards**.


**Beyond Individual Benefits:**


The paper extends beyond individual impacts, exploring the potential of remittances to **spur broader social development**. Invested in productive activities, they can stimulate local economies, generate **employment opportunities**, and foster infrastructure development. Remittances can also contribute to **improved education** and **healthcare systems**, leading to an overall rise in human capital and well-being.


**A Complex Landscape:**


However, de Haas acknowledges the multifaceted nature of this relationship. Remittances can sometimes reinforce **inequalities** within communities, with wealthier households benefiting more. Brain drain, where skilled individuals migrate, can leave sending communities with **labor shortages** and hinder long-term development. Additionally, reliance on remittances can create **dependence**, making recipient communities less resilient to economic shocks.


**Navigating the Nuances:**


The paper emphasizes the need for **context-specific** analysis to understand the true impact of remittances on social development. Different factors, such as migration patterns, recipient country policies, and cultural dynamics, need to be considered to develop sustainable development strategies. De Haas calls for **policy interventions** that maximize the positive impacts of remittances while mitigating potential drawbacks.


**In Conclusion:**


"Remittances, Migration, and Social Development" by Hein de Haas is a valuable resource for any Master's Sociology student interested in the intersections of migration, development, and social realities. It provides a nuanced understanding of remittances, moving beyond simplistic narratives to highlight their complex interplay with social structures and their potential to both empower and challenge development paths.


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"Remittances, Migration and Social Development: A Conceptual Review of the Literature" by Hein De Haas is a comprehensive study that examines the role of migrant remittances in the development of sending countries. The paper can be divided into several key points:


1. **Migration and Development**: The study begins by discussing the relationship between migration and development, highlighting the importance of remittances as a key factor in the development process. It emphasizes that the developmental impact of migration depends on the interaction between migrants and their home communities, as well as the policies and programs implemented by both sending and receiving countries.


2. **Remittances and Poverty Reduction**: De Haas argues that remittances can play a significant role in reducing poverty, as they often flow to the poorest households and are used for basic needs such as food, housing, and education. However, the study also acknowledges that the developmental impact of remittances is not limited to poverty reduction, as they can also be used for infrastructure, health, and other community-level investments.


3. **The Role of Remittances in Development**: The paper explores the various ways in which remittances can contribute to development, including direct investments in infrastructure, health, and education, as well as indirect effects such as gender empowerment and social inclusion. It also discusses the potential trade-offs between different uses of remittances, such as the choice between investing in infrastructure or human capital.


4. **Challenges and Opportunities**: De Haas identifies several challenges in the literature on remittances and development, including the need for better data and more rigorous evaluation methods. He also highlights the potential of digital technologies to transform the way remittances are sent and used, as well as the role of diaspora organizations and networks in facilitating development projects.


5. **Future Research**: The study concludes by suggesting directions for future research on remittances and development. This includes a call for more interdisciplinary and longitudinal research, as well as a focus on the role of digital technologies and diaspora networks in shaping the development impact of remittances.


In summary, De Haas's "Remittances, Migration and Social Development: A Conceptual Review of the Literature" provides a comprehensive overview of the role of migrant remittances in the development of sending countries. By examining the various ways in which remittances can contribute to development, the study highlights the importance of understanding the complex interactions between migration, remittances, and development policies.


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Saturday, December 16, 2023

What are the benefits of consuming Chyawanprash in winter?

 What are the benefits of consuming Chyawanprash in winter?


Chyawanprash is considered nutritious for people of all age groups. Ayurveda says that Chyawanprash helps to increase the resistance to disease in the human body.


Currently, the multinational companies Dabur, Patanjali, Multani, Java and other companies are producing and selling Chyawanprash in the market. Among those companies, Dabur Chyawanprash, which is made by mixing various herbs, ghee, sesame oil and honey, is considered to be the leader.






The word Chyavanaprash from Sanskrit is a formula created with the ancient Indian knowledge of Ayurveda and modern science. Chyawanprash is a nutritious jam, which plays a role in making our health healthy and fit.


Ghee, sesame oil and honey act as stimulating agents to take the herbs deep into the cells. While honey helps to neutralize and protect the effects of other major elements. Chyawanprash helps to make muscles strong, supple and strong.




If you consume Chyawanprash, the skin becomes soft and shiny. Consuming Chyawanprash is also beneficial in reducing the signs of aging with increasing age. Similarly, Chyawanprash is considered beneficial for increasing memory and digestive system.


The company claims that Dabur Chyawanprash contains a mixture of various herbs, amla, ghee, sesame oil and honey.


How to use Chyawanprash?


Chyawanprash can be consumed at any time rather than at a specific time. Even in the winter season, consuming it is more beneficial to the body. Chyawanprash can also be consumed directly, but it is more useful if consumed with warm milk or warm water.


For adults, use one spoon twice a day, one spoon in the morning on an empty stomach, one spoon before breakfast and 30 minutes before dinner. For children between 3 and 12 years of age, half a teaspoon should be given twice a day.


Benefits of Chyawanprash


Chyawanprash helps to increase immunity. It is beneficial in cough and cold caused by dust and change of weather. It also helps to increase vigor and vigor in the body.


Consuming Chyawanprash is also said to help fight against malnutrition caused by lack of nutrients and wrong digestive system. Companies claim that Chyawanprash also works against various types of infections as it contains various chemical herbicides.

Monday, November 6, 2023

Why are the voices of boys and girls different?

 Why are the voices of boys and girls different?


Why are the voices of men and women not the same? Why is every person's voice different? How can you identify a person just by hearing the voice?



This is a very interesting topic.


No matter how many people there are in the world, their voices are not uniform. Children born in the same house, from the womb of the same parents, do not have the same voice. There is something different in the voice. Moreover, male and female voices are very different.


Someone's voice is hoarse, someone's voice is melodious. Someone's voice is small, someone's voice is loud. What is the reason for such diversity in voice?


The sound we make or speak comes from the larynx in the throat. The larynx is called the larynx in medical language.


There are two chords in the larynx, between which the voice comes out through the middle of the air. In other words, sound or sound comes from vibration (vibrate) inside the vocal cords in the upper part of the trachea. The tongue and brain play a special role in speaking the voice that comes in this way in an understandable language or in a language that you want to express.


What is the position of the larynx?


The larynx is divided into two parts from the lower part of the throat. There are two vocal cords inside the larynx. Vocal cords are like strings. Sound is produced by the vibration of the vocal cords. It is located between the trachea and esophagus.


Why is the voice of men and women different?


Just as the physical structure of the face is different, the structure of the mechanism of women and men is also different. Women's vocal cords are shorter than men's. As a result, men's voices are usually thick due to long and thick layers. Whereas women's voice is a bit softer or melodious due to their longer larynx.


Likewise, not all men or women have the same voice. Just as the physical structure and face of a person are different, some are soft, some are sharp, some are pale and some are pale. Whatever the tone is, it is not a problem in itself, it is natural.


Why is someone's voice loud, someone's melodious?


If the structure of the larynx and the pressure on the larynx during breathing are high, a loud sound will be heard. If this pressure is low, the sound will be a bit mellow.


We say how melodious or sweet some people's voice is. In this way, their speaking practice is also one. According to the way people speak continuously, their voice may or may not be sweet. Our tongue, throat, facial bones and brain also play an indirect role in this.


Do people who speak loudly have problems with their larynx?


People who speak loudly and speak for a long time may have problems with the larynx.


Because when we speak loudly or for a long time, there is extra pressure on the larynx. Due to continuous friction, the problem of swelling of the flesh and water blisters occurs.


In the same way, talking in a loud voice can cause infection in the larynx.